Block, N. J. and Dworkin, Gerald, editors. The IQ Controversy. New York: Pantheon Books,

 

Block, N. J. and Dworkin, Gerald, editors. The IQ Controversy. New York: Pantheon Books,
1976.

This is an excellent collection of papers dealing with the measurement of intelligence down
through the years. The controversy which sparked the issues of the 1970s, the implicit racism of
Jensen, for example, led to this collection of papers about the possibility of measuring
intelligence. This all began with the work of Sir Francis Galton and his expectations of genetic
improvement.

Possibly the most impressive papers in this collection are the Walter Lippmann, Louis M.
Terman arguments. These papers take up the first 50 pages of the book. The intellectual
newsman, Lippmann, does a first rate job in questioning the entire construct of intelligence and
points clearly to the absurd biologism of the dangerous construct of IQ.

There are pieces by Kamin, Chomsky, Jensen and McClelland among others. Certainly this is the
best summary to its date. However, the editors have not seen fit to question the motives of the
psychologists who led the movement. It is Gould, in his Mismeasure..., who more pointedly
attacks those who were beguiled by their own assumptions.