Bellamy, H. S. Moons, Myths and Man: A Reinterpretation. London: Faber and Faber, 1936.

 

Bellamy, H. S. Moons, Myths and Man: A Reinterpretation. London: Faber and Faber, 1936.

This is not a translation so much as an appreciation of Hans Hoerbiger's "Cosmic Ice Theory,"
1913. I find the theory silly in the extreme and haven't the foggiest idea why the Nazis liked it so
much. It almost seems that they just wanted to reject all science, to reject what has been called
"the Jewish physics" of their day, and to replace it with nonsense.

The author here works with myths of the moon. Bellamy reports,for example, that when he was a
child he had dreams of the moon which suggested that the moon was much larger than it is now,
and that it appeared to be much closer to the earth. His explanation is that at some time in the
past, the moon was closer to the earth and our dreams are collective memories of that bygone
proximity. This attempts to integrate myth and Jung's collective unconscious. The misleading
thing about this yarn is that with the thousands of myths in diverse cultures, it is easy to find
examples of how they can be traced as history. It is conceivable to build up a very neat theory
which is completely wrong.

Children go to bed reasonably early and see the moon near the horizon where, for reasons best
understood by Newton, it appears as very large. So much for the collective unconscious!