Begley, Sharon; Malamud, Phyllis, and Hager, Mary. "A Case of Fraud at Harvard," Newsweek

 

Begley, Sharon; Malamud, Phyllis, and Hager, Mary. "A Case of Fraud at Harvard," Newsweek
8 February 1982, pp. 89-90, 93.

This is a good recounting of the Darsee case. It tells of the initial fakery and explains why
Braunwald did not inform everyone of it. He did terminate the fellowship Darsee had, and
withdrew the faculty appointment, but he did not inform Washington. Braunwald is quoted, "I
wasn't prepared, on the basis of these bizarre incidents, to say this man should be forever barred
from research." (p. 89)

Keeping Darsee around, rather than banishing him to the hinterlands, had other benefits:
presumptively, Kloner and Braunwald could watch him. If Darsee were canned, there would be
no way of watching him. In the summer of 1983, Braunwald believed that he had done the right
thing. By October it was clear that Darsee was continuing to wing it. It was at this point that
Harvard offered to do over again the research Darsee had fudged, at no cost to the government.
Here is a very clear report that Harvard did admit its guilt.