Booth, William. "A Clash of Cultures at Meeting on Misconduct," Science 243 (3 February

 

Booth, William. "A Clash of Cultures at Meeting on Misconduct," Science 243 (3 February
1989), p. 598.

Walter Stewart is in the limelight this month. He has a one page article in Science and,
simultaneously, a long interview published in Omni. His work on fraud in science has caught the
attention of the media and he is now a symbol of those who fight fraud in science.

The thrust of this piece is that two cultures exist in the current controversy. On one side are the
Congressional staffers, and Feder and Stewart who see their responsibilities as looking into
science because science does not seem to be doing a good job of policing itself. On the other side
are science loyalists who believe that their system works just fine and there should be no
interference with the profession. Scientists were reported to be "incredulous" regarding
Congressional staffers; and staffers, for their part, couldn't see what the scientists were all upset
about. However, one thing is very clear: scientists want to head off legislation which would
establish some sort of watchdog for science. They wish to prevent any legislation restricting the
profession. Congress, on its part, is planning more hearings for the spring.

Scientific loyalists regard Walter Stewart with anger for the part he has played in the Baltimore
case.