Berke, Richard L. "A Crusader Tilts at the Ivory Towers Looking for Old-Fashioned

 

Berke, Richard L. "A Crusader Tilts at the Ivory Towers Looking for Old-Fashioned
Corruption," New York Times, 21 April 1991, p. E4.

Of late, John Dingell has not only been attacking the institution of science but he has scored big
points: his criticisms of David Baltimore have drawn blood with Baltimore's retraction of the
Cell paper of 1986. Similarly, his investigation into the indirect costs charged the government by
large universities hit pay dirt with the excessive charges filed by Stanford. John Dingell now has
the upper hand and here is a salute to him by this newspaper.

Even Stanford's representatives are not being unkind but are here quoted describing Dingell's
pursuit of dishonesty as "vigorous." "But privately, Mr. Dingell's detractors call him a ‘new
McCarthy.' They attack him for carefully cultivating an image as a giant killer and for portraying
himself as a populist at the same time he is watering down environmental laws to protect
automobile companies in his district."

"Dingell's critics are going to charge that he's basically interested in getting his name in the
newspaper..." But even Robert M. Rosenzweig of the AAU, quoted here, suggests: "I don't
believe that universities are corrupt institutions. I don't believe they've been ripping off the
Government. Mr. Dingell has a particular investigative style that's very effective and it's not one
designed to make people happy."

He conceded, though, that Mr. Dingell "has succeeded in getting everyone's attention, every
university I know of."