Boller, Paul F., Jr. and George, John. They Never Said It: A Book of Fake Quotes, Misquotes,

 

Boller, Paul F., Jr. and George, John. They Never Said It: A Book of Fake Quotes, Misquotes,
and Misleading Attributions. New York: Barnes & Noble, 1993 (Originally, Oxford, 1989).

This is, as its title suggests a collection of misattributions. They examine the customary
identifications of famous quotes and seek to determine if those attributions are accurate. The
whole is a collection of some 235 quotes examined and found to be "wrong" in one way or
another. Thus, Horace Greeley's "God west, young man..." is found to have originated with John
Babsone Soule in the Terre Haute Express. Greeley reprinted the article in his Tribune and
correctly ascribed it to Soule. However, the public ignored the correct source and still attributes it
to Greeley. (p. 43)

There are only two famous scientists in the book. One is Newton whose "On the shoulders of
giants..." is identified as having been the work of Richard Burton's The Anatomy of Melancholy
(1624). Earlier forms of the quote go back six centuries, to Priscian.

The other great scientist who makes it is Galileo and the whole is short enough to quote here:

Does-Move Quote

"Eppur si muove (And yet it moves). There is no evidence that Galileo stubbornly whispered
these defiant words after being forced by the Inquisition in 1633 to abjure his belief that the earth
revolved around the sun. It was a French writer, writing more than a century after Galileo's
death, who first put the words in the great scientist's mouth. But they surely represented
Galileo's firm belief.

The references are: Rosenblum, "They Never Said It," American Mercury, 494; Hanser, "Of
Deathless Remarks," American Heritage, 56; Bartlett, Familiar Quotations, attributes the
statement to Abbe Irailh, Querelles litteraires (1961), 183.