Brigham, Carl C. "Intelligence Tests of Immigrant Groups," Psychological Review 37 (March,

 

Brigham, Carl C. "Intelligence Tests of Immigrant Groups," Psychological Review 37 (March,
1930), pp. 158-165.

This is Brigham's professional recanting of his 1924 publication, The Study of American
Intelligence. His withdrawal of that earlier book is based on his realization that subtest scores
should not be added, that the "intelligence" measured by an IQ test is not a single thing, a single
dimension. When authors ignore the complexities of their measures, they vitiate any meaning the
total scores may have (if they have any at all). And this is precisely what measuring "immigrants"
as a group does: it assumes that a single number is a measure of something and, then, to make
matters worse, it assumes that these individual scores can be added.

"This review has summarized some of the more recent test findings which show that comparative
studies of various national and racial groups may not be made with existing tests, and which
show, in particular, that one of the most pretentious of these comparative racial studies - the
writer's own - was without foundation." (p. 165)