Bhattacharjee, Yudhijit ed., "The Balance of Justice," Science 304 (25 June 2004), p. 1901.

 

Bhattacharjee, Yudhijit ed., "The Balance of Justice," Science 304 (25 June 2004), p. 1901.

Two figures in perhaps the most celebrated scientific misconduct case of the past 20 years are
back in the limelight. On 16 June forensic scientist Larry Steward, 46, ... head of the U.S. Secret
Service laboratory in Washington, D.C., pleaded not guilt to charges of perjury in connection
with his role in the stock fraud conviction of lifestyle guru Martha Stewart (no relation). In the
late 1980s, Stewart's analysis of laboratory notebooks was central to a congressional
investigation of scientific misconduct charges against MIT researchers Threza Imanishi-Kari. A
federal review panel later dismissed the Imanishi-Kari case, saying it found "no independent or
convincing evidence" that she had fabricated data.

An indictment by U.S. Attorney David Kelley alleges that Stewart, an ink expert, lied in the
Martha Stewart trial earlier this year when he said that he personally analyzed her stock purchase
orders. The prosecutor alleges that junior experts in the Secret Service actually did the work.
Attorney Judith Wheat of Washington, D.C., who represents the accused agent, says her client
"stands by his work and his testimony." And New York state officials argue that the stock fraud
conviction cannot be appealed just because of this legal mess.

On 8 June, Nobelist David Baltimore..., the molecular biologist who co-authored papers with
Imanishi-Kari and came under fire for defending her, won recognition from a former employer
that gave him chilly treatment during the furor. New York City's Rockefeller University, which
had eased Baltimore out of its presidency at the peak of the misconduct flap in 1991, named him
Doctor of Science (honoris causa), its highest honor. Current president Paul Nurse said the award
for Baltimore, now president of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, was "the
homecoming of Rockefeller University's most distinguished alumnus."